The New Newgate Calendar

Blogs about the history of crime, justice and punishment

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On August 31, 1767, Thomas Nicholson hung in chains at Carleton for murdering his godfather Thomas Parker — a sort of god-filicide. And we would tell you all about this (rather banal) crime and the (extremely interesting) lineage of the hanging-in-chains...
The Old Watch House site was first used as a convict barracks and gaol. The original building was erected in about 1820, of brick, with a strong stockade. It later became the watch House for the district where offenders were kept pending trial.In time...

In my prison notebook

29 August 2016
Last year I came across a rare archival find: multiple editions of a 19th century prison newspaper covertly produced by Russian inmates between 1890 and 1905. The newspaper editions, now brittle paper manuscripts fraying brown along their edges, were...
My PhD research focuses on the prosecution of fraud at the Old Bailey from 1760 to 1820. Having previously worked for a number of prosecuting agencies, including the Serious Fraud Office, I became well-acquainted with the great number of difficulties...
Love Tokens were made by prisoners as a keep sake for their loved ones and each had their own message, name, image etc. on them; a piece of them their families could keep while they were imprisoned or transported to another country. My aim was to decide...
‘Two Gentlemen Regarding the Gibbets with Satisfaction’, from The Newgate Calendar. (www.exclassics.com) In the year 1776, Cheltenham was a fashionable spa town, visited by ladies and gentlemen from all over the country. Among those visiting...
February 1837 They find Sarah Rands in the taproom at the Sir Samuel Hood, laughing and drinking with a group of girls, teasing their jovial admirers. Her hazel eyes sparkle under a green velvet bonnet that frames her flushed cheeks, tied at the chin...
Regular users may already be aware that following a recent security incident affecting the servers on which the websites are hosted, Old Bailey Online has been operating with extremely limited functionality and London Lives has been unavailable....
Please join us on 5 September 2016.  
I’ve recently been looking at the criminal activities of Cornish women in the 19th century, placing their offences within their wider economic and social context. However, here, I thought I’d focus in on one particular Cornish family, to show...

The Murder of PC Cock

2 August 2016
When I was growing up in Old Trafford, I had no idea that, a century earlier, a young police officer had been fatally shot just a few yards from where I used to live. This tragic but fascinating case of murder, with an unexpected twist, is the subject...
Martha Bacon, 26, was one of the first inmates of Broadmoor, when it opened for women in 1863. Seven years before, she had been charged with killing her children - two-year old Edwin and Sarah, 11 months old. From obscurity to infamy, Bacon's name shocked...
the many-headed monster Brodie Waddell If you’re in Britain and reading a history blog, you’ve probably spent most of the last week thinking about Brexit, reading about Brexit, and arguing about Brexit. I’m sure at least some of you...
I will be giving a public talk at the University of Chicago’s Institute of Politics on July 13. It will address research I’ve conducted this summer as part of my fellowship with the Black Metropolis Research Consortium.
In a couple of weeks time I’ll be giving a short paper as part of a panel on Radical London at the Radical Histories conference at Queen Mary University in Mile End. I’m talking at 4.15 on Friday 1st July (program [pdf]) alongside Sarah Wise,...

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