The New Newgate Calendar

Blogs about the history of crime, justice and punishment

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A quadruple lynching in rural Georgia on this date in 1946 shocked America. These murders of two African-American couples near Moore’s Ford Bridge are described even to this day as America’s last unresolved mass lynching; that dubious milestone...
Sunday 2 August 1818 Jemima Emmerson takes time between chores to sit on her step, cradling baby George in her arms, and soaking in the warm afternoon sunshine streaming into the yard. She listens out for her husband John to come strolling back from the...

Fairview, Bellerive

25 July 2016
Emigrating from Scotland in 1856 and settling in Bellerive, the O’May family came to dominate the trans-Derwent ferry service. Crossing the river was potentially dangerous and many lives had been lost through the negligence & drunkenness of...
  Recently the Prosecution Project celebrated its completion of 100,000 records. We have marked the occasion with presentation by the project team of some of the research being carried out with these records. On Friday 14 July we presented at the...
Martha Bacon, 26, was one of the first inmates of Broadmoor, when it opened for women in 1863. Seven years before, she had been charged with killing her children - two-year old Edwin and Sarah, 11 months old. From obscurity to infamy, Bacon's name shocked...
On Thursday 25 June 1857, Inspector John Townsend of the Reading Borough Police received news of a murder in King’s Meadow, a recreational ground of open fields between Reading station and the river Thames. Accompanied by his superintendent, he...
My social media feeds are often full of requests for podcast recommendations, or friends talking about which ones they’re currently listening too. I often work whilst catching up on my favourite podcasts, so thought it was worth summarising...
The Iglesia de la Merced, in Quito, was built in 1737 on the remains of the original church that dated from 1538 – four years after the foundation of the city. The church is situated in the city centre, at less than one kilometre distance from...
the many-headed monster Brodie Waddell If you’re in Britain and reading a history blog, you’ve probably spent most of the last week thinking about Brexit, reading about Brexit, and arguing about Brexit. I’m sure at least some of you...
I will be giving a public talk at the University of Chicago’s Institute of Politics on July 13. It will address research I’ve conducted this summer as part of my fellowship with the Black Metropolis Research Consortium.
My PhD research explores changing policing strategies, and how these affected who was arrested, and why. The period between 1780 and 1850 witnessed extensive changes to the English criminal justice system, and London was at the forefront. The Metropolitan...
In a couple of weeks time I’ll be giving a short paper as part of a panel on Radical London at the Radical Histories conference at Queen Mary University in Mile End. I’m talking at 4.15 on Friday 1st July (program [pdf]) alongside Sarah Wise,...

Snail Water - and why.

21 June 2016
Dorothea Repp's 1703 recipe would delight any horrid little schoolboy.Snayle Water Take a peck of Garden Snayles in the Shell, wash them well in Beer and take away their froth, put them in a sieve that the Beer may run away from them, heat your Oven...
“The Horrible Discovery at Gloucester”, on the front page of the Illustrated Police News, 16 June 1883. (British Newspaper Archive. Image copyright The British Library Board. All Rights Reserved.)     Charles and Adelaide Reece lived...
Preparing for my upcoming talks, I spent rather too much time creating this image using emojis.  There is actually no black sheep emoji, I got him elsewhere.  

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