The New Newgate Calendar

Blogs about the history of crime, justice and punishment

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Themed Set: The 2010s

26 May 2016
While Executed Today does not aspire to walk the daily news beat, our eight-plus years on the scene have tracked an ample quantity of hangings, shootings, injections, and beheadings around the world, truly enough that this site really could subsist on...
November 4th 1804, Lieutenant Colonel William Paterson, and a fleet of ships HMS Buffalo, HMS Lady Nelson, the Francis & the Integrity, entered the mouth of the Tamar on the north coast of Van Diemen’s Land, with a party of 181 including troops,...
Poster designed and created by Emma D Watkins (Graphs by Dr. Richard Ward) Twitter: @emmadwatkins / Blog: https://emmadwatkins.wordpress.com/    

Murder in Ryde

23 May 2016
I am very fortunate to have a house on the Isle of Wight and I really appreciate my time on the Island as a quiet refuge from the madness of daily life. However, I had no idea how dangerous it is there until I researched local crime for my talk at the...
My new article, ‘“I am not very well I feel nearly mad when I think of you”: Male Jealousy, Murder and Broadmoor in Late-Victorian Britain’, compares representations of jealousy in popular culture, medical and legal literature,...
Convict love tokens were a highly significant aspect of the prison system in the eighteenth and nineteenth century. They were small coins generally used as a gift or a memento by a prisoner to a family member or loved one. The love token was usually laid...
At common law, married women could avoid being convicted of certain offences simply by the fact that they were married. Coverture meant that women were, to an extent at least, legally subsumed by their husband – they lost some property rights, for...
I have often written about irresistible impulse, the alienist-defined condition for excusing a crime. Two articles recently unearthed - one from the mid-19th century, the other published just a few weeks ago - resonate (through time) with the...
by Kellie Moss   Captain Stirling’s exploring party 50 miles up the Swan River, Western Australia, March, 1827 http://nla.gov.au/nla.pic-an226047 In June 1829, Governor James Stirling founded the Swan River Colony on the mainland of Western...
  In 1947 a leading psychiatrist, Dr John McGeorge, told the New South Wales Department of Justice that men who abused children were ‘the most dangerous sex offenders’. These men, he went on to assert, were ‘often in a position...

good news.

29 April 2016
Excited to announce that next fall I will be joining the faculty of the University of Connecticut-Hartford as an Assistant Professor of US history. Thrilled to be apart of the UConn Department of History and the many exciting changes at the Hartford campus!
The American criminal justice system was the focus of our exchange trip to Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana. Dr Brown, his colleague and students were perfect hosts, allowing us insights into law enforcement in the United States that surpassed anything...
Dorothea Repps’ 1703 recipe for ‘Diet Cake’ demonstrates the changing use of language over time. We use the word ‘diet’ when taking about any food or drink stuffs we consume but something advertised as a ‘diet cake’...
It is a real pleasure, for the first time, to host  a guest writer on this blog. The following informative article written by David Craig unearths some very interesting information about another  Detective at Scotland Yard in the mid-Victorian...

Imprisoned in Play

15 April 2016
  I will be speaking at the Horrible Histories? Children’s Lives in Historical Contexts conference on Thursday 16 June 2016 at King’s College London. I am part of a panel with my fellow Digital Panopticon PhD Candidate Emma Watkins...

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