The New Newgate Calendar

Blogs about the history of crime, justice and punishment

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On this date in 1683 the English politician and philosopher Algernon Sidney (or Sydney) was beheaded to uphold (so he conceived it) “the common rights of mankind, the laws of this land, and the true Protestant religion, against corrupt principles,...
Smithfield in 1852 (from Thomas Miller, Picturesque Sketches of London Past and Present, 1852 A drover (a man who brought cattle and sheep into market such as Smithfield) was summoned before the magistrate at Lambeth Police Court by a gentleman named...
Richard Bell’s recent post showed how a humble garden billhook could a potential tool of violence against prisoners. Keys, doors, locks, and grates could wreak a subtler kind of violence. Newgate Prison door (c. 1780), in Museum of London.By...

Glenora, Hobart

4 December 2016
In 1836, a windmill was built by William McRobie which was adjacent to the former Trinity burial ground which was located at the upper end of Campbell Street. The windmill was purchased by George Arnold in c1870, who then converted the site into a biscuit...
I fail to see what is liberal or democratic about Sarah Olney’s victory at the Richmond Park by-election. Olney is the ninth member of parliament’s rump party. The so-called Liberal Democrats, a political project committed to reducing...
In this blog post I review the documentary ‘A Secret History of my Family: Gadbury Sisters’, which aired in 2016, and discuss how it reflects changing attitudes to convict ancestry amongst British and Australian descendants. It is re-blogged...
19 November 2016...Copyright Dr Alice WhiteThought readers might be interested in Wellcome Library, London's Bedlam: the asylum and beyond exhibition and associated Wikipedia project. Hats off to all involved. A hugely enjoyable...
V0011105 Credit: Wellcome Library, London Franz Joseph Gall leading a discussion on phrenology with five colleagues, among his extensive collection of skulls and model heads. Coloured etching by T. Rowlandson, 1808. I believe it was George Bernard Shaw...
By Sara M. Butler; posted 17 November 2016. With the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther’s Ninety-Five Theses looming brightly in the distance, I am once again thinking of the Reformation, a subject upon which much has been written. In a paper I...
William Scriven was a rag-and-bone man who lived at Dorn’s lodging house, in Gloucester. The house was situated in a passage on the Island, at the bottom of Westgate Street. In the same passage, next door to Dorn’s establishment,...

making a scholarly website.

10 November 2016
Recently I gave a brief presentation at UConn about why scholars should consider building websites and how they might go about it. I have beefed up my Google Slides to include points that I made in the presentation. You can access the slideshow here.

A foreign fighter

1 November 2016
Research Brief 25 Among the lighter sentences awarded to those convicted in the Victorian Supreme Court in the nineteenth century was that of ten days imprisonment handed down to James ‘Charley’ Davidson in March 1865. His offence, however,...

The smuggler’s return

31 October 2016
5 February 1840 Charles Lewis Redwood stands at the helm, steering the St Leonard into the Yare. He remembers the tightening of his stomach the last time he watched Yarmouth coming into view, shackled with his men aboard the Admiralty cutter as his sloop,...
In a previous blog post, I briefly mentioned the role that the time of the day played in arrests and detection of ‘suspicious behaviour’ on the streets of London. Policing agents explained that their suspicion was aroused when they saw individuals...

Weavers in the Mint

25 October 2016
Below is the short – 20 minute long – talk I gave at the Radical Histories / Histories of Radicalism conference at the beginning of July. I was presenting alongside Sarah Wise, speaking on the radical venue Eclectic Hall on Denmark Street,...

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