The New Newgate Calendar

Blogs about the history of crime, justice and punishment

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This was probably a fairly typical property crime: the theft of a lodger’s property by another person living in the same house. Many Londoners lived cheek by jowl with others in the 1800s in lodging houses that had little privacy or security. Individuals...
On this date in the pregnant year of 1789, the former boulevard actor Francois Bordier hanged for a bit of revolutionary overexuberance. He’d gained his fame in the 1780s for his portrayals of both Harlequin (on stage) and a besotted gambler (in...
Part of Pen & Sword’s guides for family historians, exploring and analysing a variety of sources, Jonathan Oates’ latest book, Tracing Villains and their Victims (Pen & Sword, 2017) is not to be confused with Stephen Wade’s Tracing...
Between 16th and 21st July 2017, Dr Will Pooley (The University of Bristol), recipient of a British Academy Rising Star Public Engagement Award, convened a conference on ‘Creative Histories’ at the Clifton Pavillion, Bristol Zoo Gardens. ...
Posted by Sara M. Butler, 15 August 2017.  Game of Thrones (GoT) season is here again, and along with it comes the perpetuation of an image of the Middle Ages as a lawless society in which violence is ubiquitous and bears no consequences. Watching...
“The King’s Highway”, from Magazine of Art, 1881 (via http://www.ancestry-images.com) On a night in June 1763, a highwayman rode out to work on the roads between Bath and Tetbury.  He found his first victims...
A woefully delayed update since my last posting…though the time has not been misspent.I am thrilled to announce a new, two-book deal with Pen and Sword (publishers of Mad or Bad. Crime and Insanity in Victorian Britain)…The first title,...
Londonlowlife Review: Simon Parkes, Black Flag (independently published, 2017), pp. 458, RRP £9.99  “Those memory sticks you had analysed, the circumstantial evidence you’ve gathered surrounding them, the Mossad guy, the woman...
We’re pleased to present the following guest post by Alex Wakelam, a doctoral student in the Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure studying eighteenth-century female insolvency and the functioning of debt imprisonment....

summer update.

1 August 2017
I’m blogging less! Some people say blogs are dead? As I get deeper into my book project, Community of the Condemned: Chicago and the Transformation of the American Jail, I’ve been molding my research into the necessary academic forms....
    From the first scene of Inspector Edmund Reid poring over his files in the flickering gaslight of Leman Street police station, I’ve been hooked on Ripper Street, and I’ve avidly followed the adventures of the Whitechapel detectives...
Much of the land around Sandy Bay was granted to settlers who had come from Norfolk Island in 1808. Many of the grants ranged from between 20 & 100 acres and most of them were fronting onto the Derwent River. The Government reserved the right to create...
  The small sandstone island of Cockatoo Island in Sydney Harbour is best known as a convict stockade which held the ‘worst’ of the convict system: former-Norfolk Islanders and bushrangers are its most famous inhabitants. However, from...

Artful

21 June 2017
Theatre Royal, Launceston Tasmania, Monday 27 July 1874 Theatre Royal, Launceston, from Weekly Courier, 19 August 1905, p. 22 Joshua Artis elbows his way through the milling bodies to stake his place in the centre of the pit. Expertly he balances his...
The recent election fiasco gave no answer to the important Brexit questions. This is because the election failed to engage with the issues. In this respect, both main parties are culpable, but I am sure their reluctance to address the questions comes...

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