The New Newgate Calendar

Blogs about the history of crime, justice and punishment

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From the Santa Rosa Press-Democrat, January 26, 1898: The pretty little city of St. Helena nestling in the picturesque Napa valley just a few miles from the Sonoma county line is now shocked and dismayed over one of the most hideous crimes, bristling...
October 21 1855 was the 50th anniversary of the Battle of Trafalgar and the death of Nelson but the England that emerged from the long wars with France looked quite a different place from the world Horatio Nelson was born into. By the 1850s his Norfolk...

Book Review: Same Sex Love

18 October 2017
Gill Rossini (2017) Same Sex Love: A History and Research Guide, Barnsley: Pen and Sword HistoryIt is 50 since the Sexual Offences Act 1967 decriminalised homosexual acts between two men over the age of 21 years, in private, in England and Wales. Gill...
The following post is based on a paper presented at “Writing Prisons: Literature and Constraint in Early Modern England,” a mini-symposium held at Birkbeck in July (and kindly written up at the time by Brodie Waddell). In this post, I’d...
Just highlighting a forthcoming event here that sounds interesting; if you’re in the East Midlands on Saturday 28 October, the Market Harborough Historical Society is hosting a Crime and Punishment in Leicestershire  history day at the...
  By Anna McKay, AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Partnership Student, National Maritime Museum & University of Leicester.   In 1775 the outbreak of the American Revolution halted the transportation of felons to the colonies. One year later,...
By Krista Kesselring; posted 9 October 2017. Trials of queens generally garner much attention, perhaps in part because they so often focus on sex. The trials of Henry VIII’s wives provoke enduring popular interest, most obviously. The adultery...
On 6 May 1799, the Gloucester Journal reported that ‘two genteely-dressed women’ had been committed to the city gaol, after stealing a quantity of lace from a milliner’s shop in Gloucester. The pair had been pursued and apprehended in...
Built 1839 – 40, largely through the efforts of the Rev Robert Russell, this church is one of the most important colonial buildings in Tasmaniain that it has retained its quality without significant change to its external appearance or its outstanding...

Six Drinks Short

28 September 2017
Wake-up. Six drinks short, of sanity. Who will it be – Dr Jekyll or Mr Hyde – sleepwalking out of sobriety? Playful pisshead or demented dypso, how does she bear? See, for fuck’s sake, her devotion; her tender touch, caressing your...
As inferred last time, Baker Brown's demise was too slow in coming. Though once the wheels of condemnation had turned, he was soon a doomed man, destined to be remembered in history as the 'butcher' of women's bodies and minds…From his emergence...
In which I do some cheerleading for the R Project for Statistical Computing. 1. You’re almost certain to find it worth the effort Often, in the endless “should academics learn to code” debate, it’s not clear to newcomers what you...
This is the first of several blog posts I’m going to publish about mews (mewses?) in the coming months. I love these little backstreets. They tend to be right in the middle of a busy urban area, but tucked away from main thoroughfares and considerably...
Prof Barry Godfrey and myself were awarded funding from the Public Engagement (PE) Awards Scheme (2016-2017) by the University of Liverpool to produce an educational resource. It is the hope that this PE Award would allow the building of public understanding...
      In the recently-released film, The Limehouse Golem, one of the flashback scenes depicts a murder victim with her eyes removed (nice, I know). This rather gruesome crime is linked to the Victorian fascination with ‘optography’...

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