The New Newgate Calendar

Blogs about the history of crime, justice and punishment

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We have visited previously the 16th century diary of Swiss medical student Felix Platter during his studies in Montpellier This book portrays the 16th century through the remarkable Platter family. Platter isn’t a diarist of executions in particular:...
We all know that person — that superhuman Ph.D. candidate teaching for the first time. She spends hours crafting her lectures. She took a whole weekend to come up with the perfect learning activity. She gives meticulous comments on student assignments....

Launceston Post Office

25 September 2016
Launceston gained its first overland mail service from Hobart in 1816, a decade after the city was established in 1806. It is claimed that this was the first overland mail delivery service in Australia. Postal services in the form of a private house post...
Kate Summerscale tells the true-crime story of child murderer Robert Coombes. No author of historical crime-fiction could come up with a more credible storyline of sin and redemption. This morality tale benefits from meticulous research into the crime...
Our recent trip to Australia for the Digital Panopticon conference was an invaluable opportunity for so many reasons. We were able to connect and learn from our colleagues across the globe, share our work and develop new ideas and, perhaps most rewarding...

‘I fear ye man is lost’

19 September 2016
A sad traveller’s tale from early 18th-century Denbigh, occasioned by this tweet: Ouch! #histmed #earlymodern accidents while travelling or working! https://t.co/kAqjNGC3fi — Lisa Smith (@historybeagle) September 19, 2016 In September 1726...

Inside Reading Prison

12 September 2016
I first visited Reading Prison when it was still a young offenders institution. I had a fascinating tour with one of the warders who shared stories from its long history, including some ghostly sightings. Now that it has been decommissioned, Reading Prison...

From Mistress to Murder

9 September 2016
In the light of yet another modern-day, 'mad or bad' killer - Sarah Williams - comparisons were drawn with Mary Pearcey, 24, who, in late 1890, killed the wife of her lover and their 18 month-old girl.Noted for its brutality, and pleading madness in court,...
During my PhD study and for the first ten years of my academic career, I researched alone. I went to the archives, I discussed and presented my work to academic audiences, and I published books and academic papers. Though like many others, I felt myself...
Convict prisons kept some of the best records about prisoners in the nineteenth century. They tell us where prisoners came from, what they did for a living and their record of previous convictions. But more than this, they detail how men and women spent...

Mewing like cats

4 September 2016
The Infirmary, Great Yarmouth Gaol May 1837 The Gaoler catches the two young women leaning out of the infirmary window, flirting with the men in the airing yard below. They jump down hastily when he shouts their names.[1] It’s three weeks since...
Love Tokens were made by prisoners as a keep sake for their loved ones and each had their own message, name, image etc. on them; a piece of them their families could keep while they were imprisoned or transported to another country. My aim was to decide...
‘Two Gentlemen Regarding the Gibbets with Satisfaction’, from The Newgate Calendar. (www.exclassics.com) In the year 1776, Cheltenham was a fashionable spa town, visited by ladies and gentlemen from all over the country. Among those visiting...
Regular users may already be aware that following a recent security incident affecting the servers on which the websites are hosted, Old Bailey Online has been operating with extremely limited functionality and London Lives has been unavailable....
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