The New Newgate Calendar

Blogs about the history of crime, justice and punishment

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In 18657 Henry Mayhew wrote that that there were 8,600 prostitutes in London who were ‘known to the police’ (others suggested that in total there were 10 times this number of ‘unfortunates’). Mathew believed the higher figure was...
Actor Lytton Grey, on the right in this image, was married to one of my ancestors; and attended her 18-year-old sister’s illegal marriage (© Criminal Historian) Who would you rather be descended from – a worthy notable of a provincial...

Silent Witness

19 January 2018
Silent Witness is one of my favourite TV shows and I’m currently enjoying series 21, which is airing in the UK. Although I have to cover my eyes during the gruesome bits, I love the pathologists’ puzzle-solving detective work. Autopsies have...
From the London Gazetteer and New Daily Advertiser, Feb. 2, 1767. An Account of the CRUELTIES, exercised by JOHN WILLIAMSON on his wife, whereby she left her life, and for which he was lately executed in Moorfields. JOHN WILLIAMSON, Journeyman Shoemaker,...
Guest post by Shannon McSheffrey; posted 12 January 2018. In 1430, Henry Ciprian and Roger Bukke, two Augustinian canons, fled from their priory at Waltham, Essex, and sought sanctuary at the collegiate church of St. Martin le Grand in London. Their request...

Blog Update

12 January 2018
Thank you to everyone who has followed the blog over the past 5 years or so. Also thank you to those who have commented, provided additional information or corrected posted information.As you have probably noticed, the frequency of posts over the past...
  Alison Eatwell has an easy narrative style which she uses to good effect in this study of early nineteenth-century petitions for clemency, which were laid before the Home Secretary in the hope that a convict might gain a revocation or reduction...
To complement the ‘Criminal Lives, 1780-1925: Punishing Old Bailey Convicts’ exhibition at the London Metropolitan Archives, the AHRC Digital Panopticon team are contributing a free public events programme.  Event information and booking...
Sketches of the Chedworth shooting in the Illustrated Police News, 1 Jan 1925, via British Newspaper Archive (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk). The victim was originally named as George Gardner, later corrected to William. The ‘Mrs Gardner’...
Join the Old Bailey Online team at the launch of the new exhibition Criminal Lives, 1780-1925: Punishing Old Bailey Convicts! The exhibition is a collaboration between the Digital Panopticon and the London Metropolitan Archives. The launch event...
We are delighted to publish this guest post by John Owen Havard, Assistant Professor of English at Binghamton University, whose forthcoming work includes a book on the origins of disaffected attitudes towards politics and a new project on thinking about...
Graphic content. Please consider this a trigger warning for descriptions of self-inflicted injuries, blood and hanging.If you follow me or ‘Race and the Death Penalty’ on Twitter you’ve probably noticed that I got very excited recently...
By Dr Kristyn Harman Senior Lecturer in History, University of Tasmania   Like many New Zealanders, I grew up hearing stories about the Australian penal colonies, particularly anecdotes of London pickpockets and similarly desperate, impoverished...

spring 2018 book lists.

25 October 2017
All books listed are required and can often be found for a lower cost through websites like Amazon. Required: Audra Wolfe, Competing with the Soviets: Science, Technology, and the State in Cold War America Dave Eggars, Zeitoun Required: Lisa...

Six Drinks Short

28 September 2017
Wake-up. Six drinks short, of sanity. Who will it be – Dr Jekyll or Mr Hyde – sleepwalking out of sobriety? Playful pisshead or demented dypso, how does she bear? See, for fuck’s sake, her devotion; her tender touch, caressing your...

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