The New Newgate Calendar

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At about four in the morning of June 23 1870 Mr Richard Valpy and his family returned to their home in Wimbledon, having spent the evening and night at a party. All seemed well; they were greeted by the butler – Turner – and went to bed. At...
Pastel painter Rosalie Filleul (English Wikipedia entry | the far more detailed French) was guillotined on this date in 1794, during the Paris Terror. The prodigy daughter of a Paris, young Rosalie Boquet — as she was born — exhibited several...
The first Church on this site was begun in 1829. The district, which comprised the plain to the north and east of the Western Tiers, watered by the South Esk and its tributaries, was named "Norfolk Plains," because its first settlers were a number of...

New book!

22 June 2017
New publication! A History of Gloucester Prison, 1791-1950.  Published by Glos Crime History Books, May 2017. ISBN 978-1-5454-7984-1. Paperback, 136 pages, 13 b+w illustrations, index and bibliography, £8.50. (Kindle version, £1.99.)...
The Findmypast search page for its crime collection Findmypast added a final 68,000 records to its collection of England and Wales Crime, Prisons and Punishments records last Friday, with its collection now being the largest set of English and Welsh crime...
  The small sandstone island of Cockatoo Island in Sydney Harbour is best known as a convict stockade which held the ‘worst’ of the convict system: former-Norfolk Islanders and bushrangers are its most famous inhabitants. However, from...

Artful

21 June 2017
Theatre Royal, Launceston Tasmania, Monday 27 July 1874 Theatre Royal, Launceston, from Weekly Courier, 19 August 1905, p. 22 Joshua Artis elbows his way through the milling bodies to stake his place in the centre of the pit. Expertly he balances his...
The recent election fiasco gave no answer to the important Brexit questions. This is because the election failed to engage with the issues. In this respect, both main parties are culpable, but I am sure their reluctance to address the questions comes...
By Cassie Watson; posted 11 June 2017. On the afternoon of Friday 27 September 1895 news broke of the discovery of the body of a young woman lying dead on a bed at 10 Denmark Street, Soho. She had been shot in the heart; beside her lay a man who, though...
Research brief 29 Why do people need lawyers? This may sound like the start of a joke. Yet the need for lawyers remains a serious issue for anyone seeking protection of their constitutional rights, arbitration in civil disputes or a fair trial in criminal...
From the Act for the Relief of the Poor of 1662, or so-called “Settlement Act” onwards, various pieces of 17th- and 18th- century legislation formally codified entitlement to parochial poor relief by “settlement“. The main ways...
Digital Panopticon teamed up with the London Historians for a transportation themed ‘History in the Pub’ event, on 16 May at The Sir Christopher Hatton, London. We were joined by around 60-70 people for a lovely evening of talks, music and...
Profiling the Alienists - VIII (continued)Continuing from Part 1of this two-part posting, profiling Victorian alienist, Dr Alexander John Sutherland - controversial contributor to the 'mad or bad' clamour. The trial in 1855 of Luigi Buranelli has ended...
The exciting life of juvenile transportee Charles Brewer   Description List: Record CON18-1-13 Born in 1821, Charles was convicted aged fourteen in 1835, of pickpocketing a handkerchief worth six-pence in Milton Street. Charles received seven...
Last week, on Monday 10 April, I was fortunate enough to attend a day conference hosted by the International John Bunyan Society on “Prisons and Prison Writing in Early Modern Britain” held at Northumbria University. Given how relevant the...

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