The New Newgate Calendar

Blogs about the history of crime, justice and punishment

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With the memory of the royal wedding fading away but leaving, by all accounts, a warm romantic glow behind it, I thought I’d continue the theme a few days later. In April 1887 Emma Banks took a room in a house in Smith Street, Chelsea. She had arrived...
On the 21st or perhaps the 20th of May in 1525, the peasant rebel Jakob Rohrbach — more commonly known as Jäcklein (“Little Jack”) Rohrbach — was chained to a stake and burned alive as the nobility celebrated its victory in...
The Great War was still fresh in everyone’s minds when, one snowy night in Hitchin, Hertfordshire, a middle-aged shopkeeper was found murdered in her corner shop, her dog lying dead nearby. Elizabeth Ridgley, aged 54, was a spinster who lived alone,...
In the history of detectives, Eugène Vidocq is one of the most important and controversial figures of all. A convicted criminal, he turned thief-taker and later established the first detective department in the world.
Posted by Sara M. Butler; 3 May 2018. In the late fifteenth century, John Medewall brought his petition before the chancellor at Westminster. He explained his dilemma. Purportedly written from his prison cell in London, he recounted how one John Grenefeld...
This post takes a look at an open dataset available through the University of Pennsylvania’s open access repository. The dataset, Indentures and Apprentices made by Philadelphia Overseers of the Poor, 1751-1799 (created by Billy G. Smith), is one...
We are delighted to publish this guest post by Esther Brot, who is currently pursuing her PhD in History at King’s College London. She is writing her dissertation on the topic of the Corporation of London and the prisons of the City of London in...

The hanging years

9 April 2018
As one of the two original Australian convict colonies, Tasmania shares with New South Wales an ignominious history of capital punishment in the first half century of settlement. The Prosecution Project has recently completed an inventory of executions...
Happy Women's History Month (with 10 minutes to go!)The events over the last few weeks in Belfast have compelled me to write a blog post about rape that I have had in the back of my mind for several months. The original impetus for writing something on...
(The acceptable face of cross-dressing – in the theatre. From The Tatler, 15 Jan 1908, via British Newspaper Archive. Image ©The British Library Board.) In the first decades of the twentieth century, variety shows in Britain’s theatres...
We’re pleased to announce updates to both Old Bailey Online and London Lives. Key changes are summarised below. The updated XML data will be made available shortly. One unwanted change is that, following extensive discussion about its feasibility,...
In 2017 I was fortunate to meet and work with wife and husband team Susanna Hoe and Derek Roebuck. Susanna is an established writer in the field of women’s history and Derek is a practitioner and writer in the field of mediation and arbitration....
Developed with, and for, school pupils this series of exercises examines historical criminal justice sources and uses new digital tools to build pupils understanding of historical crime and punishment, but also enhance awareness of the innovative methodologies...
Margaret Lamb was born in Lancashire in 1896.  Her Parents were Margaret and Edward Lamb, her father worked as a canal boatman. Margaret was the oldest of the Lamb’s five surviving children. In early life, Margaret was, in many respects, indistinguishable...
'The Chieftain' a biography of Detective Chief inspector George Clarke, published by The History Press, 2011Six years ago I finally achieved one of the main tasks on my 'bucket list':  to complete my research on an ancestor who had worked as a senior...

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