The New Newgate Calendar

Blogs about the history of crime, justice and punishment

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On this date in 1770, the King of Yorkshire counterfeiters hanged (along with one of his subjects) at York’s Tyburn gallows. Hartley was the chief of a band of currency manipulators who achieved surprising success and longevity operating from the...
One murder sometimes leads to another and following my recent post about Thomas Jennings, who poisoned his children, historian Sarah Spink kindly shared with me information about another murderer whose life ended on the gallows in Reading. Just before...

Red Feather Inn, Hadspen

27 April 2016
The Red Feather Inn is a heritage listed building in Hadspen's main street. It was built as a coaching inn and in the 21st century has been used for a restaurant and accommodation. The building's frontage is a substantial sandstone single-storey building....
I. Crime and Trial On the morning of April 21 1864, M. D. saw her husband to the front door as he left for work, as she did every morning. After he had gone, she returned to the kitchen and murdered her two young children. Following the crime, she walked...
The American criminal justice system was the focus of our exchange trip to Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana. Dr Brown, his colleague and students were perfect hosts, allowing us insights into law enforcement in the United States that surpassed anything...
"The circumstances of her alleged crime are unparalleled in the records of medical jurisprudence."Prompted by a modern 'infanticide inquest' - and whether attitudes have changed since the Victorian age - the following lesser-known case encountered...
The Convict Love Tokens website The National Museum of Australia has the world’s largest collection of ‘love tokens’ made by convicts, dating from 1762 to 1856, and is displaying them online at http://love-tokens.nma.gov.au. The website...
Dorothea Repps’ 1703 recipe for ‘Diet Cake’ demonstrates the changing use of language over time. We use the word ‘diet’ when taking about any food or drink stuffs we consume but something advertised as a ‘diet cake’...
It is a real pleasure, for the first time, to host  a guest writer on this blog. The following informative article written by David Craig unearths some very interesting information about another  Detective at Scotland Yard in the mid-Victorian...

The Great Escape

19 April 2016
Peter Kropotkin is remembered today as a brilliant Russian social revolutionary, geographer, scientist, and anarchist writer. Less well known, however, is the name of the friend and co-conspirator who significantly prolonged Kropotkin’s life by...

Imprisoned in Play

15 April 2016
  I will be speaking at the Horrible Histories? Children’s Lives in Historical Contexts conference on Thursday 16 June 2016 at King’s College London. I am part of a panel with my fellow Digital Panopticon PhD Candidate Emma Watkins...
Jack Sheppard was a thief and robber, born in London in 1707. During  the year 1724, he was gaoled five times and escaped on four occasions, but was finally hanged at Tyburn on 16 November 1724. His prison-breaks made him into a national...
I am aware that I might be treading on very thin ice here but for the past few days I’ve been raging inside against the system that all historians have to cope with to get their work published. I am referring to the publication of journal articles...
The Digital Panopticon is a phenomenal tool but its success is ultimately dependent on the quality of past record-keeping. The eighteenth and nineteenth century data on which the project is based is outstanding in its detail and range,...
For decades, if not longer, well-meaning parents (and perhaps less well-meaning authority figures in institutional settings) utilised the cane or the belt as an instrument of punishment. These methods are increasingly frowned upon. Corporal punishment...

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