The New Newgate Calendar

Blogs about the history of crime, justice and punishment

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In October 1849 Henry and Margaret Joyce were summoned to the Clerkenwell Police Court to be be charged with assault by Henry Herrick. The Joyces ran an ironmonger’s shop in Wilstead Street, Somers Town (near Euston in central London). Herrick was...
Readers last week will know that I was giving a talk last Friday at a conference in Northumberland. Given that I like to share my work I thought I’d put it up for you this week – I’ve even included some of the slides.  Lucky you!...

Prisoners as Voters

26 October 2016
Edward Coleburn won the 1718 by-election for alderman of the ward of Mancroft in the city of Norwich, beating his opponent William Chamberlayne by 28 votes. There was only one problem. Many of the votes cast for Coleburn had come from prisoners in the...
In a previous blog post, I briefly mentioned the role that the time of the day played in arrests and detection of ‘suspicious behaviour’ on the streets of London. Policing agents explained that their suspicion was aroused when they saw individuals...
By Krista Kesselring; posted 23 October 2016. We know that English law did not allow divorce with remarriage throughout the Catholic Middle Ages, and that the prohibition continued even after the Reformation, despite every other Protestant jurisdiction...
Review: Tom Gash, Criminal: The Truth About Why People Do Bad Things (London: Allen Lane, 2016), pp. 337, RRP £14.99 Remember that mass brawl last month, involving 100 school boys in Northumberland Heath, Bexley, South East London? “Never...

Why bigamy?

22 September 2016
Over the course of the last twenty-four posts published on this blog, I’ve established beyond reasonable doubt that Derbyshire-born dentist Joseph Boden committed bigamy when he married my great-great-aunt Elizabeth Robb in 1841. And I’m fairly...
Case files for murder trials: The case of Cyril Johnson / Auntie MaggieWhile I’ve been wrapping up on my PhD I’ve been working one afternoon a week as a Freelance Research Consultant for Leicester’s Story of Parks project. Project Officer...

Brislington

20 August 2016
By Michaela Ann Cameron Originally published on The Dictionary of Sydney (2015) Brislington, Parramatta’s oldest existing dwelling house, was built by convicts for a pardoned convict around 1821 on the site of Burramattagal hunting grounds. The...
Dorcas Carr and her colleagues introduced me to the women defined as prostitutes in Victorian Swansea. She will feature in one of the dramatised accounts in my new book. In 1888, Dorcas Carr was described as ‘a woman of ill fame’ by The Cambrian...
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introducing the boys in blue

24 February 2016
this week my 2nd year undergraduates are learning about the history of the police. Every year I teach this I try and think about how I get this across and whether I really have time to unpack all the complexities of the creation of the Met in 1829. Having...
In this blog post I will be looking at Henry Tyrel's followers. I spoke about Henry in two of my previous posts and as you now know he caused murder and mayhem across south-west county Dublin and north county Kildare in the early fourteenth-century. He...
Women in Hobart, Tasmania recall their convict ancestors. http://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2015-05-10/remembering-women-convicts-hundreds-don-bonnets-in-tribute/6458546
In 1837, wealthy landowner and ex-magistrate James Mudie returned to London and published a book entitled The Felonry of New South Wales. In it, he described the law courts and the legal profession in New South Wales as “a sink of corruption and...

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