The New Newgate Calendar

Blogs about the history of crime, justice and punishment

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View over Bala Lake, with woman in Welsh costume; from the National Library of Wales (used under Creative Commons) An interesting case from 19th century Wales this week, where it could be debated whether the victim’s family got justice, and whether...
On this date in 1884, a French expeditionary force’s summary battlefield expeditions marked its retreat from an ambush — and the approach of the Sino-French War. Having established a foothood in south Vietnam (Cochinchina), France was pushing...
My PhD research explores changing policing strategies, and how these affected who was arrested, and why. The period between 1780 and 1850 witnessed extensive changes to the English criminal justice system, and London was at the forefront. The Metropolitan...
This building was constructed in 1842 as a Watch House. Designed by Alexander Cheyne in 1838, the Watch House served many of the functions of a modern day police station. It provided accommodation for police constables, as well as separate confinement...
In a couple of weeks time I’ll be giving a short paper as part of a panel on Radical London at the Radical Histories conference at Queen Mary University in Mile End. I’m talking at 4.15 on Friday 1st July (program [pdf]) alongside Sarah Wise,...

Snail Water - and why.

21 June 2016
Dorothea Repp's 1703 recipe would delight any horrid little schoolboy.Snayle Water Take a peck of Garden Snayles in the Shell, wash them well in Beer and take away their froth, put them in a sieve that the Beer may run away from them, heat your Oven...
To celebrate National Crime Reading Month I’ve been reading crime fiction. I began with Two for Sorrow by Nicola Upson, which drew me back into the sinister world of baby farming. In the novel, real life crime writer, Josephine Tey, investigates...
  In 2016 the domestic violence epidemic shows no signs of slowing down. It seems Australian men are going mad. Women – and children – are dying as a result. The ever-increasing tally of deaths and serious injuries is prompting many to...
It’s time to start my book, Conviction: stories from a nineteenth-century prison. Sharing my blog posts here, I’ve been experimenting with a different kind of history writing that uses literary devices to bring to life voices and experiences...
James George Davey, Medical Superintendent, Northwoods Asylum, BristolPlease note: I have had to publish this without preview - apologies for any errors in layoutLacking, of late, an alienist biography, here is a brief resume of Dr Davey, of Northwoods...
  At the end of last week, thirteen Nobel prize-winning scientists wrote a letter to the right leaning newspaper The Daily Telegraph, urging Britain to vote ‘remain’ in the forthcoming European Union (EU) referendum. The scientists warned...
“The Horrible Discovery at Gloucester”, on the front page of the Illustrated Police News, 16 June 1883. (British Newspaper Archive. Image copyright The British Library Board. All Rights Reserved.)     Charles and Adelaide Reece lived...
Preparing for my upcoming talks, I spent rather too much time creating this image using emojis.  There is actually no black sheep emoji, I got him elsewhere.  

Evaluation Post

29 May 2016
Overall, I found the module to be an enriching learning curve, not only in the course content but also with using digital humanities and research techniques. When I enroled onto the course, I had little knowledge of Victorian Judicial practice and using...
My new article, ‘“I am not very well I feel nearly mad when I think of you”: Male Jealousy, Murder and Broadmoor in Late-Victorian Britain’, compares representations of jealousy in popular culture, medical and legal literature,...

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